​​​​​​​​Adjustment of Status (AOS)
We have solid experience in handling AOS matters. Adjustment of Status is a procedure that permits an eligible applicant to become a lawful permanent resident of the United States, while in the United States, without having to go abroad and apply for an immigrant visa.

 Steps:

  • Determine your basis to immigrate
  • File the immigrant petition (family based, employment based, special classes of immigrants, and humanitarian programs)
  • File Form I-485
  • Go to your Applicant Support Appointment (get fingerprinted)
  • Go to your interview (if applicable)
  • Get your final decision in the mail

 

Non-Immigrant Visas
The various steps involved in obtaining a Non-Immigrant U.S. visa -- such as a student, H-1B, or tourist visa -- can take from a few days to several months. There are many categories, and you should always consult with an immigration attorney regarding the options best suited for you.


More common Temporary Worker Visa categories: 

  • H-1B
    • To work in a specialty occupation. Requires a higher education degree or its equivalent
  • H-2A
    • For temporary or seasonal agricultural work
  • H-2B
    • For temporary or seasonal non-agricultural work
  • O
    • For persons with extraordinary ability or achievement


Other categories of common Non-Immigrant Visas include but are not limited to the following:

  • A
    • Diplomat or Foreign Visitor
  • B-1
    • Business Visitor
  • B-2
    • Tourism, Visitor, Medical Treatment Visitor
  • F
    • Student: University, College, High School, Private Elementary School
  • J
    • Au Pair or Exchange Visitor
  • M
    • Vocational or other recognized nonacademic institution
  • R
    • Religious Worker

Immigrant Visas
Immigrants Visas usually cost more than obtaining a Non-Immigrant Visa, and it is highly recommended to hire an immigration attorney to assist in these matters. Generally, Immigrant Visas require a basis for application like family or employment.


More common Immigrant Visa categories:

- Family Based:

  • IR1, CR1
    • Spouse of a U.S. Citizen 
  • K1
    • Fiancé(e) to marry U.S. Citizen & live in U.S.
  • IR3, IH3, IR4, IH4
    • Intercountry Adoption of Orphan Children by U.S. Citizens
  • IR2, CR2, IR5, F1, F3, F4
    • Certain Family Members of U.S. Citizens


- Employment Based:

  • EB-1
    • Priority Workers
  • EB-2
    • Professionals Holding Advanced Degrees and Persons of Exceptional Ability
  • EB-3
    • Skilled Workers, Professionals, and Unskilled Workers (Other Workers)
  • EB-4
    • Certain Special Immigrants
  • EB-5
    • Immigrant Investors


Entering the United States, either permanently or temporarily is exciting and rewarding but takes time, money and energy! As there is endless minutia with immigration applications and processes, it is advisable to seek help of an immigration attorney before making any decisions or mistakes which may hinder your application.


Waivers

  • ​​I-601 Waiver (Extreme Hardship)
    • Certain foreign citizens who are ineligible to immigrate to the United States because they are “inadmissible” can request a waiver (forgiveness) of inadmissibility.
  • I-601 A Provisional Waiver
    • I-601 A Provisional Waiver allows certain immediate relatives of U.S. citizens to apply for a provisional waiver of the three- and ten-year bars for unlawful presence, before leaving the U.S., to attend their consular interview. Generally, without this waiver, an applicant would have to leave the U.S. and apply from their country of origin for their consular interview.
  • I-212 Waiver
    • The I-212 waiver allows you to apply for early readmission into the U.S. after you were previously removed and before you stayed the required amount of time outside the U.S.
  • 212(h)  Waiver
    • Section 212(h) of the Immigration and Nationality Act provides a discretionary waiver for the following criminal grounds of inadmissibility:
      • Crimes involving moral turpitude - 212(a)(2)(A)(I)
      • Multiple criminal convictions - 212(a)(2)(B)
      • Prostitution and commercial vice - 212(a)(2)(D)
      • Certain aliens who have asserted immunity from prosecution - 212(a)(2)(E)
      • An offense of simple possession of 30 grams or less of marijuana - 212(a)(2)(A)(i)(II)
  • 212(d)(3) Waiver
    • Section § 212(d)(3) of the Immigration and Nationality Act waives virtually all grounds  of inadmissibility for non-immigrants including health, criminal, prostitution, smuggling, and unlawful presence.  The only grounds of inadmissibility not waived are certain security-related grounds related to plans to overthrow the government, espionage, sabotage, genocide, and Nazi Persecution.